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METEA MEDIA

Your World. Your Stories. Everyday.

METEA MEDIA

Your World. Your Stories. Everyday.

METEA MEDIA

Madrigals finish off their winter concerts for 13th annual performance

The+energy+of+a+Madrigals+performance%2C+featuring+this+years+dance+revolution+on+top+of+the+usual+drama%2C+is+consistently+one+of+the+most+appealing+traits+of+the+show.
Ell Macias
The energy of a Madrigals performance, featuring this year’s dance revolution on top of the usual drama, is consistently one of the most appealing traits of the show.

Metea Valley’s renaissance-inspired and Christmas choir group, Madrigals, performed their first live shows beginning Dec. 14, spanning into the weekend. The audition-based group is famous for its extravagant December concert that happens the week before finals.

The paid performances following the final dress rehearsal include a dessert reception and a Yuletide Feaste. Although Metea sponsors many other choir groups, Madrigals is unique due to its heavily detailed performances that include storytelling, personalized costumes, jesters, and, what is probably most exciting, food. But to the performers, the excitement comes from the sense of community. 

It’s like the epitome of art back in the olden days, [with] music, rivalry, and a storyline,” sophomore MadriGals performer Jensen Trinko said. “It’s telling a story, especially with these pieces, it’s telling a very specific story of Jesus and being jolly and all  of the feelings.”

For those unaware of Madrigals, or “Madz”, the group has been a seasonal, audition-based choir for thirteen years. Performing each winter, the concerts serve as a time capsule featuring the music, fashion, and architecture of Renaissance England. 

[You] are taken back into a time capsule of the 1500s in renaissance England, where any guests and audience members are guests of the king [at Metea Kingdom],” Madrigal’s sponsor Paulette Body said. “Renaissance songs and Christmas music are performed along with jesters, instrumentalists, recorders, brass, and strings, and it is a festive show that is interactive. And, it beautifully ushers in the festive season. For so many people, music during the holidays is an essential part of the Christmas season, so we love the fact that we can give a musical gift to our community. Madrigals has been part of this community for over a decade.”

However, the biggest appeal of the winter concert is the excitement that is built up in the atmosphere. This is done with music, decor, and actors socializing with the audience.

“It takes a lot of energy, but it’s very fun,” senior jester Grace Greubal said. “You kind of hype up the audience and somewhat narrate. You kind of are the transition between songs and you add to the story a little bit – comedic relief.”

Although the comedic performances may be the highlight for the audience, the long-lasting relationships built by the seasonal choir are what matter most to Trinko.

 “For me, it’s the people. I love the people in Madrigals,” Trinko said. “So, to get to sing with them and act with them is probably one of my favorite parts. The music is amazing and everything, but the people make it amazing.” 

There is a lot of work that goes on behind the scenes to allow this whimsical show to happen.  From the audition process to Tech Week, students are working incredibly hard to polish the spectacle.

 “They have been singing Christmas music since August,” Boddy said.“They rehearse every week, once a week […] and most cast members will have learned 15 songs, but certainly, they are also singing renaissance music from the 1500s and 1600s, and then along with Christmas music. They also were able to do some caroling before the Collage concerts in the lobby.” 

Madrigals members rehearsed for an extended period leading up to the show, but the rehearsals had greatly increased in intensity as the concerts neared. 

“We have been preparing since before school started, actually,” Trinko said. “The week before school started we got together and did a big retreat where we sang through everything, and we’ve had rehearsals once a week, sometimes more, up until now. Now we have six-hour rehearsals after school,” said Trinko, 

Not only do rehearsals become amped up as the show date approaches, but the musicians also focus more on detail. 

“We get a little brain break before rehearsal, a good 15 minutes, and then we get the music on its feet,” Trinko said. “Then we work through all the technicalities, and then we can see if we can do it acapella, or without accompaniment, and just do it as a group. Then we work on little things more, instead of doing the general piece over and over again.”

To the musicians involved, Madrigals is not only just a Christmas show but also a bonding experience that can create lifelong friendships. The experience was magical for both the audience and choir and the result reflected the months of dedication and love that the musicians put into the finished product.

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About the Contributor
This is Ell’s first year of being a part of the Visuals team on the Newspaper staff. They have a passion for capturing candid moments in photography, which is what motivated them to work in their section. Typically, they are painting, sketching, or working on dioramas during their downtime and will never beat the artist stereotype of carrying a sketchbook everywhere they go. Furthermore, they will never turn down the opportunity to talk about goth bands.

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